Dorian Webb

Cuban Artistry

2.00
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Cuban Artistry

2.00

One of my favorite memories of Cuba was visiting Jaimanitas, the home of artist Jose' Fuster, in the northwestern corner of Havana. Inspired by the work of Gaudi and Brancusi, for more than 30 years, Fuster has been hard at work transforming his sleepy village into a mosaic version of Alice's Wonderland, rightly called Fusterlandia.  He's made impressive inroads: eye-popping, cheerful mosaics sprout from EVERY surface imaginable at his home and have spread to the homes of 80 neighbors.

Dizzying with its dedication to beautification through bits of tile and glass, Fuster's World is the embodiment of the power of a creative vision to connect people and places. To some extent he does what every (thought provoking) artist does-  he takes something that is often overlooked and imbues it with meaning, altering it completely. Although Fuster's work gives an appreciative nod to Picasso and Dubuffet,  the undulating, glinting surfaces also seem singularly emblematic of Cuba's history and resilience.

Luckily for me, his acrylic on tile paintings are available for purchase to support his continuing efforts to expand Fusterlandia.  I snapped up this one of a fisherman, along with a few others to remind me of that special place.

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One of my favorite memories of Cuba was visiting Jaimanitas, the home of artist Jose' Fuster, in the northwestern corner of Havana. Inspired by the work of Gaudi and Brancusi, for more than 30 years, Fuster has been hard at work transforming his sleepy village into a mosaic version of Alice's Wonderland, rightly called Fusterlandia.  He's made impressive inroads: eye-popping, cheerful mosaics sprout from EVERY surface imaginable at his home and have spread to the homes of 80 neighbors.

Dizzying with its dedication to beautification through bits of tile and glass, Fuster's World is the embodiment of the power of a creative vision to connect people and places. To some extent he does what every (thought provoking) artist does-  he takes something that is often overlooked and imbues it with meaning, altering it completely. Although Fuster's work gives an appreciative nod to Picasso and Dubuffet,  the undulating, glinting surfaces also seem singularly emblematic of Cuba's history and resilience.

Luckily for me, his acrylic on tile paintings are available for purchase to support his continuing efforts to expand Fusterlandia.  I snapped up this one of a fisherman, along with a few others to remind me of that special place.